Category Archives: General

Some housekeeping notes

I’ve decided to shut MangaViews down. It didn’t get the type of support it needed to continue, and it was too much for me to try to keep up with the data entry on my own, although there were several people who helped. I really appreciate the efforts of everybody who pitched in to start it up. It didn’t seem like there was enough interest to keep it going. I probably am trying to maintain too many sites as it is, and with work and everything I’m not even able to update what I consider to be my core blogs as much as I’d like.

Amethyst Tumblr is still going strong! Starting that tumblr is helping me restore the images on all the Amethyst recaps on this blog (I accidentally overwrote the archived images when a wordpress update went horribly wrong). So far, there are images up for the first mini-series and about half of the second mini-series. Slowly but surely!

After being loyal to libarything for a long time, I’ve switched over to goodreads just because it seems like an easier tool to keep track of my current reading habits.

No More Malware

Apologies if you tried to visit this site and found it listed as an attack site. The malicious code was removed, and everything seems to be working fine now.

Tokyopop Manga Pilot Program Links

Here’s a little link round-up of some of the reactions to the Tokyopop Manga Pilot Program. A couple of these may make their way over to When Fangirls Attack, but since the internet seemed to break in half for a couple people the last time I posted multiple times in a row I’m probably not going to do another WFA manga post for a couple of days. So this is for future reference:


The Dual Nature of Tokyopop

“Manga Pilot Agreement”
Tokyopop’s Manga Pilot Pact
Zudacomics v. Tokyopop: Round 3!
Tokyopop Manga Pilots Backlash
Tokyopop May or May Not Possibly Eat Babies
TOKYOPOP Pilot Program Rips Off, Talks Down To Artists
Justice is Still Important
Warning: Tokyo Pop Really likes to Screw over Creators
What? You dun want to sell your soul to Tokyopop? What are you? French?
Tune in Tokyo… Pop

Tokyopop’s Manga Pilot Pact Signs Away Legal Rights
HURT COMICS: TokyoP0p: I’m buying Tom Spurgeon a Drink
May. 29th, 2008

Boys Over Flowers, Before and After

One of the things I like about following long-running manga series is seeing how the art evolves over time. I think one of the best examples of this is the shoujo classic Boys Over Flowers. Here are some scans from the first volume, where Tsukushi makes an impression on Tsukasa by kicking him in the face:

kick in the face

Continue reading

Joining When Fangirls Attack

I’ve been sending in links to When Fangirls Attack for a little while, and I’m now on board officially. Thanks very much to Ragnell and Kalinara for the invitation to join their blog! I’m going to be focusing on manga linkblogging, since I figure everyone else has other areas of comics covered. If you know of any blogs or livejournals that focus on manga and gender that I should add to my rss reader, or if you want to send me any links please e-mail me at tangognat @ tangognat.com.

T is for Tugboat: Navigating the Seas from A to Z

T Is for Tugboat: Navigating the Seas from A to Z by Traci N. Todd and Sara Gillingham (amazon)

There are plenty of alphabet books out there, but T is for Tugboat is a handsomely designed book with a nautical theme that will appeal to any fans of boats, oceans, or maritime trivia. The color palette of red, blue, white, and tan sets off pages that list several items for each letter of the alphabet. For example, N is for Neptune, Navigate, and the Nina, Pinta, and Santa Maria and A is for Anchor, Ahoy, and Aground. The illustrations seamlessly combine historical photos, line drawings, and more detailed illustrations of the items that represent the alphabet. The reference librarian in me particularly appreciated the detailed pages on maritime flag code, knots, and Morse code. It would be easy to use this book as a jumping off point to further explore other related topics. There’s a mini quiz on the back flap of the book that tests the reader’s knowledge. T is for Tugboat is more sophisticated than the typical alphabet book, the publisher recommends it for ages 4-8.

There are two other books in this series, A is for Astronaut and C is for Caboose. So if you have a space buff or train hobbyist in the house, you might want to check those books out as well.

Review copy provided by Chronicle Kids Books